College of Law Lecture Series

Endowed Lecture Series

Ann F. Baum Memorial Elder Law Lecture

In remembrance of the life of Mrs. Ann F. Baum, a gift through her estate has endowed the Ann F. Baum Memorial Elder Law Lecture. This lecture series seeks to promote the relevant and timely discussion of broad range of issues relating to the intersection of public policy, the law, and the elderly.

Mrs. Baum was born November 11, 1922, into a poor Irish Catholic family. A life-long resident of the Chicago area, Mrs. Baum grew up with seven siblings. She and her husband, the late Alvin H. Baum, operated an investment firm in Chicago. Mr. Baum passed away in 1982, and Mrs. Baum passed away in 2005.

Mrs. Baum and her late husband were compassionate individuals who supported a broad array of charities as well as providing direct support to needy individuals. Targets of their giving included the disadvantaged, the young, the elderly, religious organizations, educational organizations, and civic organizations. Their legacy of giving and sharing is continued through the Alvin H. Baum Family Fund of which Alvin and Ann were both benefactors.

The Ann F. Baum Memorial Elder Law Lecture constitutes a fitting memorial to a woman who was deeply concerned with the rights and issues pertaining to elderly people in our society.

David C. Baum Memorial Lecture on Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

The family and friends of David C. Baum endowed the David C. Baum Memorial Lecture on Civil Liberties and Civil Rights not only in his memory, but at his request.

Deep concern for the dignity and rights of all people was central to Professor Baum’s character and activities. After receiving his undergraduate and legal education at Harvard University, Professor Baum served as law clerk for Justice Walter V. Schaefer of the Illinois Supreme Court, 1959-60. He then practiced law with the Chicago firm of Ross, McGowan, Hardies and O’Keefe until he joined the faculty of the University of Illinois College of Law in 1963.

Professor Baum was an inspiration to his student and colleagues, not only because of the excellence of his teaching, scholarship, and public service, but because of his remarkable human qualities. Conscientious and judicious, blending passion for justice with dispassionate objectivity, he inspired the highest level of discourse and endeavor in all who had the privilege of knowing and working with him.

It is hoped that the David C. Baum Memorial Lecture on Civil Liberties and Civil Rights will constitute a fitting memorial to a man whose unrelenting intellectual vigor and moral commitment made his presence in the world of law invaluable.

Vacketta-DLA Piper Lecture on the Role of Government and the Law

This series was made possible through the generosity of Carl Vacketta, ’65, and DLA Piper, which has more than 4,200 lawyers in offices in Asia Pacific, Europe, the Middle East, and the United States; and represents more clients in a broader range of geographies and practice disciplines than any other law firm in the world.

The Vacketta-DLA Piper Lecture Series is a component of The Marbury Institute, named for William L. Marbury, Jr. (1901-1988), who was instrumental in the development of the firm and devoted his career to public and community service. The Institute serves as DLA Piper’s initiative to promote the highest ideals of the legal profession.

Paul M. Van Arsdell, Jr. Memorial Lecture on Litigation and the Legal Profession

In commemoration of the life and accomplishments of Paul M. Van Arsdell, Jr., the law firm of Latham and Watkins, the Van Arsdell family, and his many friends, colleagues, and clients endowed the Paul M. Van Arsdell, Jr. Memorial Lecture on Litigation and the Legal Profession. This lecture series promotes thoughtful discussion on litigation and dispute resolution systems and the highest ethical ideals of the legal profession.

Mr. Van Arsdell received his bachelor’s degree in 1969 and master’s degree in 1971 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. After serving as an officer in the United States Army from 1971 until 1973, he returned to the University of Illinois where he received his law degree in 1977, earning a Rickert Award for Legal Writing and serving as managing editor of the University of Illinois Law Forum.

Following his graduation from law school, Mr. Van Arsdell clerked for Judge John Godbold of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit in Montgomery, Alabama. He began his practice in 1978 as an associate for the Chicago-based law firm of Hedlund, Hunter and Lynch, moving to their Los Angeles office in 1980. In 1982 the firm merged with Latham and Watkins; Mr. Van Arsdell became a partner in 1985.

Mr. Van Arsdell was an outstanding young litigator involved in consumer law and was a role model for younger attorneys. He was regarded by his colleagues as a very hard-working attorney and regularly shared his experiences and expertise with others. He became the youngest head of the firm’s finance committee, a demonstration of the firm’s deep respect for him and his work.

Dean’s Lecture Series

The New Lincoln Lectures

In commemoration of the sesquicentennial anniversary of President Lincoln’s death and then, two years later, of the founding of the University of Illinois, the University of Illinois presents The New Lincoln Lectures: What Abraham Lincoln Means to the 21st Century. The series features luminaries in various fields related to law, government, and history, who reflect on Lincoln’s legacy and its continuing relevance – both in their individual lives and the life of the nation – 150 years after his passing.

Dean’s Public Engagement Lecture

The Dean’s Public Engagement Lecture Series aims to increase interaction between the legal academy, the legal and business professions, and the public.

Hosted by Dean Vikram David Amar, the Series brings distinguished judges, lawyers, and businesspersons to the College of Law to talk on cutting-edge issues affecting law, justice, business, and government.